Top authors in Get in Character auction raise over £14,000 for children and young people with cancer

CLIC Sargent’s second annual Get in Character charity eBay auction has raised an incredible £14,485 to support its work with children and young people with cancer. 

Top authors in Get in Character auction raise over £14,000 for children and young people with cancer

Book fans get bidding!

Since 26 February super-fans of over 70 best-selling authors have been bidding for the opportunity to have their name, or a loved one’s name, written into their forthcoming novels. 

The auction finished at 8pm last night (Sunday 8 March), with the highest bidders each winning the opportunity to have a character named in their chosen author’s next book.  

The highest single amount for a character name this year was paid by a mystery bidder who spent £3,200 for a spot in a new book by transatlantic quadruple no.1 bestselling author Lee Child.

Over £1,220 was paid by one uber-fan for the chance to appear in a novel by crime writer Peter James, while another bidder paid £1,015 for a spot in thriller writer Simon Kernick’s next book. Authors Amanda Jennings and ex-soldier Andy McNab both raised over £500 each by donating character names.

Thanks to this incredible support we raised almost £11,000 more than last year’s auction. 

The Get in Character auction also offered people the chance to bid on the opportunity to meet their favourite author, to have their own writing critiqued by an author, or to buy signed book bundles. 

Kate Apperley, eBay co-ordinator at CLIC Sargent, the UK’s leading charity for children and young people, said: “We are so grateful to each and every author who took part in our Get in Character event this year – and to all the people who made a bid.    

“Thanks to this incredible support we were able to smash our fundraising target, and raised almost £11,000 more than last year’s auction. 

“Every penny raised will make a difference by helping us provide the emotional, practical, financial and clinical support that children and young people with cancer need to help them cope with cancer and get the most out of life.”

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