Imogen's story

Imogen was diagnosed with cancer when she was four-years-old, after developing an ache and a lump in her stomach. Mum Miranda said: "The moment of diagnosis was a complete shock. It felt like falling off a cliff." 

Imogen's story

Treatment started straight away and Imogen had eight weeks of chemotherapy and 10 days of radiotherapy. 

When the doctors says 'cancer'

“The first person we spoke to from CLIC Sargent was Audrey and she was just brilliant. The first time she came in I was in tears and saying I couldn’t deal with it. She sat me down and took me through what I could do, how they could help, and where to go for all of the support. It was so well timed. Having someone there who could lead you through all this was really important.

Using play to cope

“Imogen did well with everything, but it’s so hard for a child of her age. She decided, understandably, that she hated doctors. She just wanted it all to stop.

"When a doctor comes they are bringing needles and cannulas and they will be operating on her. She wanted them to just leave her alone and leave her lump in there. It’s so hard because you know she needs it.

"It was tough for her but Laura, her CLIC Sargent Play Specialist really helped Imogen understand her treatment.

"Imogen was able to be so brave because of the help Laura gave her. She was calm and she would do everything she could to get it right. I don’t know how they do what they do. They manage to make it so that they have this shared relationship of trust with the child. 

“When we met Laura she was absolutely brilliant. She welcomed Imogen into the play room and worked with her with crafts and she just bonded with her straight away.

"They would get on so well together and then she would show her what it is they needed to do with the radio and the machines. She got her to understand what she was doing and would make it fun for her. They actually put her cuddly dolphin toy through it first to help her understand. She thought, ‘if the dolphin can do it, so can I’. 

"We are appreciating the little happy times. They are what it's all about, like dancing around in the kitchen or playing together."

“The most amazing thing was the fact that she could go through it all without the general anaesthetic. Normally you would need that for child to stay still for such a delicate operation. But she was able to be so brave because of the help Laura gave her. She was calm and she would do everything she could to get it right. It really was really impressive and made something which could have been another ordeal a lot better for the whole family.

“We have had so much support from family and friends. When you first break the news to people it’s hard because you relive it all yourself every time.

"When your child is diagnosed with cancer you learn to live each day and appreciate it."

Imogen is doing well now. Miranda says: "We are in a place now where we are appreciating the little happy times. They are what it's all about, like dancing around in the kitchen or playing together. Those are the important ones."

Order your free information booklet

Order your free information booklet and find out how a gift in your Will could  one day make a difference.

One in eight of the children and young people with cancer we help are supported thanks to gifts left in Wills.

Share